According to the terms of the agreement, the choice of bishops and abbots in Germany in the presence of the emperor (or his legatee) as judge (“without violence”) was to take place between potentially conflicting parties, without bribes, thus retaining the emperor a decisive role in the selection of these great territorial magnates of the Empire. But without quarrels, the canons of the cathedral should choose the bishop, the monks should choose the abbey. Beyond the borders of Germany, Burgundy and Italy, the choice would be made by the Church without imperial interference. [Citation required] An agreement between Pope Calixtus II and Emperor Henry V of September 23, 1122, which found a solution to the investiture conflict. The victory was as ephemeral as that of his father Henry IV over Gregory VII. The clergy pushed Paschal to withdraw his consent, which he did in 1112. The dispute followed the predictable course: Heinrich V. He revolted and was excommunicated. Riots broke out in Germany, a new counter-father Gregory VIII was appointed by the King of Germany, the Roman nobles separated from Henry. The civil war continued, as under Henry IV. It lasted ten more years. Like his father before him, Henry V faced a decrease in power.

He had no choice but to give up the investiture and the old right to call the pope. The concordat of Worms resulted. After the Concordat, the German kings never had the same control over the Church as they did in the days of the Ottonian dynasty. [19] Henry V was reinstated in communion and recognized as a legitimate emperor. After the efforts of Lamberto Scannabecchi (later Pope Honorius II) and the Reichstag of Würzburg (1121) in 1122, Popes Calixtus II and Emperor Henry V reached an agreement that effectively ended the investiture conflict. It ended the first phase of the power struggle between the papacy and the emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and was interpreted as rendering within itself the seed of national sovereignty, which was one day to be confirmed in the Peace of Westphalia (1648); This was in part an unintended result of strategic maneuvers between the Church and European sovereigns over political control within their domains. . . .