German borrowed the French word kartell as a cartel. In the 1880s, the Germans found a new use for the word to refer to the economic coalition of the private sector, to regulate the quality and quantity of goods to be produced, the prices to be paid, the terms of delivery to be paid and the markets to be delivered. The first evidence of a connection dates back to the 12th century and links the word to things that bind, retrend or limit (for example. B a big one). The word is believed to be a phonetic variant of the group that had the same meaning. The word “agreement,” if one refers to a grammatical rule, means that the words used by an author must be aligned with number and sex (if any). For more details on the two main types of agreements, please see below: Object-Verb-Accord and Noun Pronoun. This nominal meaning is often used without a qualifying adjective (for example. B good or bad) to indicate something that is bought or sold at a price below the real value – in other words, a good deal: “At this price, the house is a good deal” or “We have a good deal on the tickets for our flight”. To do something After a long discussion to do. , there has still been no agreement on what to do next.

Agreement or support from a group, idea, plan, etc. “The CIA has since paid more than $1 million under the agreement,” the report says. The mention of Mege led them all to an agreement, because they hated him unanimously. The 26 countries have signed an agreement to reduce air pollution. The word also has a verbal meaning: “to promise or reach a formal agreement.” You will find an example in Holmes` quote at the convention (above). Another known application of the conventions is in law and politics, where it is used as a term for an agreement between two or more groups (as countries or political organizations) to regulate issues that concern everyone, for example the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. There are also the Geneva Conventions, a series of four international conventions (1864, 1906, 1929, 1949), which were signed in Geneva, Switzerland, which defined the humanitarian principles by which signatory states must treat military and civilian nationals of an enemy in times of war. In the 17th century, the cartel referred to a written agreement between the warring nations, particularly for the treatment and exchange of prisoners. This use is illustrated by Bishop Gilbert Burnet in his story of his own time (1734): “Thanks to a cartel that had been established between the two armies, all prisoners had to be redeemed at a certain price and within a limited time.” The French word derives from the Latin compromisesum, itself related to the former compromitters (promittere means “promise”).