Together, the partners form the consortium of projects which, by signing the grant agreement, undertakes to implement the project under the agreed conditions. The relationship between the consortium and the European Commission is governed by the provisions of the grant agreement. The coordinator has a special role to play within the consortium as an interface between the partners and the European Commission. All communication with the project manager is ensured through the coordinator. In addition, the coordinator is responsible for monitoring the project as well as managing the budget. The consortium shall take all necessary measures to ensure effective implementation of the projects. To this end, a consortium agreement must be signed between the project partners. This agreement manages the internal relations of the consortium. Unless otherwise specified in the work programme, the conclusion of a consortium agreement is mandatory for all Horizon 2020 projects. The consortium agreement, as a legal agreement between the project partners, helps to reduce or avoid potential conflicts.

It only governs relations between the partners and the European Commission is not part of the agreement. The grant agreement is prioritized by the consortium agreement. Consequently, its provisions take precedence over those of the consortium agreement, while the latter covers more detailed aspects. This project is directly relevant to the activities carried out by the European 5G industry and science to develop the necessary infrastructure and standards for 5G. The main objective of the project is to develop a traceable measurement technique necessary for 5G communication, to improve related measurement uncertainties, in order to support all aspects of signals, devices, systems and test environments of emerging 5G technologies and to provide metrological support in activities related to 5G standardisation. Mobile broadband communication is an essential instrument for the prosperity of EU citizens, illustrated by a growth rate of composite data of 40% per year, depending on demand. The definition of the next generation (5G, planned for 2020) is incomplete, but it assumes that it is necessary to extend operating frequencies above 6 GHz and support a significantly higher user density to meet the target specifications (millisecond-laty, seamless connectivity, low power consumption and 1000 times the capacity of 4G). As far as project management is concerned, the European Commission offers the consortium quite a great deal of flexibility. At the same time, this implies a great responsibility for the consortium and, in particular, for the coordinator and project management. A particular challenge is to balance the interests and objectives of the people and institutions concerned.. . .

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