This is an old problem that financial companies face when recovering vehicles subject to lease, conditional sale and leasing contracts. So what is the legal situation when faced with requests for payment of repairs and storage costs from third parties in possession of a vehicle? The Auto Repair Industry Trade Organization (AVRO) recommends a roughly similar pricing structure, so why is the credit rental and accident management industry in a bubble where its fees are so high that they are unreasmly similar to industry recommendations and legislation? From the consumer`s point of view, the problem lies in the fact that the contract between the credit lessor and the owner of the vehicle involved in the collision without error. The owner of the damaged vehicle concludes a contract under which he rents the vehicle from the credit lessor on the basis of a credit agreement, the invoice being payable later and the costs directly recovered by the credit lessor from the insurer of the indebted driver. Perhaps the most common scenario that financial firms face is when a customer leaves a vehicle with a repair shop and is unable or unable to fill out the repair shop invoice. As a result, the workshop refuses to release the vehicle until the repair costs are paid and can often contain storage costs, especially when the dispute has been going on for some time. Financial companies may be involved in this dispute if the underlying financing contract is overdue, has been terminated and then an attempt is made to recover the vehicle. they do not adequately assist the credit lessor in bringing an action against the third-party insurer. “The fact that a plaintiff had to rent a replacement car for so long because he didn`t have the money to buy one is a right to irreprolity, as well as an assertion that he had to pay for credit notes because he didn`t have the money to rent in the normal market… Generally speaking, defiant insurers resort to “embarrassment tactics” rather than any legal point – and rely on the latest unexplained area of credit rental law – which is the “way for the tenant” to hire locally and not at credit rental rates, – the so-called “irreverence” argument, which requires pay slips, credit cards and bank statements to show that the applicant could have afforded it, a car at spot rates and not the higher rental of “credit credits”. . .

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